moss little black dress minimalism

Less can be more. Or it can be less. There are extremes: hoarders; or the guy who owns 15 things. But there is also balance. Regardless, while a walk-in closet is some people’s idea of delightful, for me it dredges up memories of my forever unkempt floor, (although to be honest, I would still love a walk-in closet.) That’s where these bloggers inspire, people who’ve lavished the filters of utility, essentialism and true love onto their lives and emerged with less. Or at least deeper reasons for keeping what they own.

There are so many benefits to having less stuff: cleaner spaces, less stuff to move if you move, and more importantly, just doing other activities besides preventing those things from cluttering your home, and searching in their murky depths for keys, bills, partnerless shoes etc. It goes without saying that enjoying what you have and investing in more quality items over disposable ones is generally better for the planet as well.

Miss Minimalist: Twenty Questions to Clear Your Clutter
This post provides a great list of things to ask of your “maybe” items, like: when did I last use you? and, would I rather have the space you take up? Especially useful: Do you belong to my fantasy self? In my case, that means you, running shoes that are practically brand new after four years; it’s time to move on to other feet.

Small Notebook It Is So Much Easier to Simplify Than to Organize
Author Rachel Meeks writes about simplifying everything from organization to finances to closets. I could spend quite a few days here and come away better for it.

Spartan Wanderer The Art of The List, Working to Live
As much a blog of self-discovery as it is a utilitarian’s guidebook, this is an awesome blog about living minimalist and exploring Sweden.

One Dress Protest What I Didn’t Anticipate
ODP is Kristy Powell, wearing one dress, every single day, for a whole year. The above post talks about her change in awareness as she gave up the undeniable high of shopping, experienced the fuzz and low of uncertainty, and ultimately revamped how she spent her free time. Powell has already completed her challenge successfully, and in the process explored themes of identity, appearance, consumerism, advertising, environmentalism…While we may not all embark on such a quest, ODP is a very interesting blog to read about all of the above and then some.

And a few great places to give unwanted items a new life:

Everything: Freecycle

Electronics: Ecosquid

Clothing: (local swap events) Clothing Swap; (web swapping) Rehash Clothes 

Toys (new): Children’s Memorial Hospital Donations (Chicago)

Books: Open Books

Advertisements